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According to the Georgia Department of Health’s noon update on Saturday, April 25, 2020, 904 people have lost their lives due to COVID-19.  That is a 3.98% death rate for Georgia.  The national average is close to 4.5%.  The number of positive novel coronavirus cases in the state is now 22,695.  Of that number, 4,326 people have been hospitalized with the virus.

In Gwinnett, 1,421 people have tested positive for COVID-19.  The death toll is 46 and has remained unchanged since the noon update on April 22.  Other hard-hit or nearby counties include Fulton 2,509, Dekalb 1,734, Dougherty 1,467, Cobb 1,377, Hall 1,027, Forsyth 244, Barrow 111, and Jackson 75.

The 18-59 age group makes up 62% of the total cases of the virus while the over 60 group comprises 34%, the under 18 group is now 2%, and the unknown group takes up the last 2%.  Females take up 54% of the cases while males are at 44% with 2% of the cases being of unknown gender.

The youngest person to have died from the virus in the state is a 22-year-old female from Muscogee County.  She did have underlying medical conditions that made COVID-19 worse for her.  The youngest person with no underlying medical conditions to die from the virus was a 27-year-old female from Lee County.  The youngest person in Gwinnett to perish from the coronavirus was a 44-year-old male with underlying medical conditions.

Across the country, 929,000 people have been confirmed to have contracted the COVID-19 virus.  The death toll in the U.S. is now 52,509.  Worldwide, 2.84 million people have been infected with the virus.  The global death toll has reached 199,000.

BY:

alicia@northgwinnettvoice.com

Alicia joined the North Gwinnett Voice, as the Editor, shortly after the first publication. She is a homegrown Buford native, with the southern charm and "bless your heart" included. ...

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